· 5 min read

If I could travel back in time and give me some advice, I’d say to myself:

247

Do not be afraid. A life worth living is a life worth dying for. Go out more, jump, fall, explore the world, get injured, bleed. There is nothing wrong with scars and tears.

1. Go through all the senses

No one else can live your life for you, so lead your own way and set your own rhythm. Grown ups are not always right, so never accept everything they tell you, specially media or authorities of any kind, check your facts, do not repeat what you are told, make your own mind and speak your own voice.

Keep an open mind to different ideas, keep an open heart for everyone you meet, and keep your eyes open because the world can pass you by in the blink of an eye and there are some wonderful things you could miss.

Be humble, you are not alone in this world, you are sharing it with millions of people, so do not try to make your life better, instead try to make a better life for everyone.

Start by learning as much as you can, and working as much as you can, because actions are what make dreams come true.

Slider
San Francisco, California 2018. © Avgust Arinich

Even if you don’t plan on taking up journalism when you get back home, the act of note-taking will give you a much greater travel experience!

Picking up your notebook and spending a few minutes now and then, jotting down what is happening around you, will make you more aware. Suddenly, you realize what the surroundings offer vastly more than you first thought.

2. Note what people say

You start to notice the colors of the walls and the sounds from the kitchen. You start to smell the food in front of you before taking the first bite, just to be able to figure out a way to describe it in words. The details of the people around you, even the colors of their eyes, will become targets for your interest.

You just can’t take too many notes. In the beginning I remember thinking that “I’ll remember that” or “I’ll look through the photos to find out what it looked like”.

“Every dreamer knows that it is entirely possible to be homesick for a place you've never been to, perhaps more homesick than for familiar ground.”

— Vincent Van Gogh

Even if you don’t plan on taking up journalism when you get back home, the act of note-taking will give you a much greater travel experience!

Picking up your notebook and spending a few minutes now and then, jotting down what is happening around you, will make you more aware. Suddenly, you realize what the surroundings offer vastly more than you first thought.

3. Note how they say it

But two weeks later, after countless of new meetings (and as many glasses of wine), details will become blurry and forgotten. And even if you know beforehand that you will write an article about one specific topic and are collecting snippets of facts for that, what if you later get the opportunity to write another piece about that topic and and notes?

Here’s a few things that will help you get started.

Video
San Francisco, California 2018. © Avgust Arinich

When you have written down what they have said, it is important to also write down how they said it. Was he shaking his head? Was his eye twitching? What kind of accent did he have? High or low pitch? Was he speaking quicker when he got excited during certain parts of the conversation? How did he move his arms and hands?

· · ·

You start to notice the colors of the walls and the sounds from the kitchen.

· · ·

I have made 86 videos for my YouTube channel in the last couple of years. 8 of them were for clients, 78 of them were for me. My focus is and always has been on making the work I care about. It is an honor to have found a way to get paid to create work like this, something I value greatly. There are no shortcuts. No one is going to pay for your vacation, no one cares, no one gives a shit and they never will. If you want something, anything, do the work and earn it.